Meet Our Providers

With providers practicing in 50 specialties at 13 convenient locations, it’s easy to find the right healthcare team at Carle.

Use the following buttons to search by the category of your choice.

Medical Services

Carle Foundation Hospital

Based in Urbana, Ill., the Carle Foundation Hospital is a 413-bed regional care hospital that has achieved Magnet® designation. It is the area's only Level 1 Trauma Center.

611 W. Park Street, Urbana, IL 61802   |   (217) 383-3311

Carle Hoopeston Regional Health Center

Carle Hoopeston Regional Health Center is comprised of a 24-bed critical access hospital and medical clinic based in Hoopeston, Illinois.

701 E. Orange Street, Hoopeston, IL 60942   |   (217) 283-5531

Carle Richland Memorial Hospital

Located in Olney, Ill., Carle Richland Memorial Hospital is a 134-bed hospital with nearly 600 employees serving portions of eight counties in southeastern Illinois.

800 East Locust St, Olney, IL 62459   |   (618) 395-2131

Convenient Care vs. ED

Carle Convenient Care offers same-day treatment for minor illnesses and injuries through walk-in appointments.

Not sure where to go? Click here for a list of conditions appropriate for the emergency department

Philanthropy

Philanthropy gives hope to patients and helps take health care in our community to a whole new level.

Classes & Events

Carle offers free community events open to members of the public. Select a category to view the calendar of upcoming events.

Treatment Options

Hematological malignancies are cancers that begin in blood-forming tissue, such as the bone marrow, or in the cells of the immune system.

Examples of hematologic cancer are leukemia, lymphoma, and multiple myeloma, also called blood cancer. Various hematological malignancies may occur. The most common ones include:

  • Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma
  • Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL)
  • Multiple Myeloma
  • Hodgkin's disease
  • Myeloproliferative disorders

Chemotherapy for Hematological Malignancies

Anticancer drugs given by IV injection or taken by mouth enter the bloodstream and affect cells in most parts of the body. However, the drugs often do not reach cells in the central nervous system because they are stopped by the blood-brain barrier. This protective barrier is formed by a network of blood vessels that filter blood going to the brain and spinal cord. To reach cells in the central nervous system, doctors may use intrathecal chemotherapy. In this type of leukemia treatment, anticancer drugs are injected directly into the cerebrospinal fluid.

Chemotherapy is usually given in cycles. Periods of chemotherapy treatment are alternated with rest periods when no chemotherapy is given. Chemotherapy may be administered in a single day, over the course of days to weeks to months. The frequency of chemotherapy depends largely on the type of cancer and type of drug or drugs being given. The length of time for chemotherapy is based on evidence guidelines, response to treatment, and side effects.

Common drugs given for hematological cancers include biological modifiers, antineoplastic drugs, and targeted therapy.

Side effects from treatment can be well controlled and may include hair loss, constipation, diarrhea, fatigue, appetite changes, nausea or vomiting, and decreased blood counts.